Let's Connect Quesnel

Community involvement and resident feedback are important steps in the City’s process for decision making, planning and project implementation.

Let's Connect Quesnel

The Let’s Connect Quesnel platform provides an interactive online space for community members to learn about City projects and initiatives, share feedback, and contribute ideas on matters important to them.

The goal of this platform is to build an active online community, providing a respectful space for residents to interact with each other, and increase the depth and breadth of public involvement in City processes and projects. 

The platform is monitored by City employees who will moderate, answer questions and share feedback with the elected City Council for consideration in important decision-making processes.

Community members can register and connect now at www.letsconnectquesnel.ca.

Featured projects of 2020 and 2021

The City of Quesnel has completed some new and exciting projects and initiatives over the last two years but due to impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, the City has not had the opportunity to properly celebrate some projects.

Please review the projects that were completed between 2020-2021.

Sprout Kitchen

Sprout Kitchen is a small-scale food processing and innovation hub that will eventually serve a region from Vanderhoof to 100 Mile House. Physically located in West Quesnel, the hub is operated by the newly formed Sprout Kitchen Society. A member of the BC Food Hub Network, Sprout Kitchen provides space and support for emerging and existing food entrepreneurs to get their ideas off the ground or scale their business for new markets.

Sprout Kitchen works with new and existing food entrepreneurs and processors from across the region to grow their business, expand product lines, and reach new markets. The hub includes bookable stations, cooler and freezer storage, cooking and baking equipment,
and will soon offer a co-packing service to members.

Start Date – End Date
Planning: 2015 – 2019
Renovations: 2020 – 2021
Open for food entrepreneurs: June 2021

Cost
$560,000 (Phase 1)

Benefit to the Community

Sprout Kitchen supports existing and future food entrepreneurs to create and expand sustainable, innovative businesses in the region. It connects producers to processors and increases the market capacity for locally grown food. Sprout Kitchen aims to inspire communities to take advantage of opportunities available in the food processing industry, strengthening and growing their local economies.

The hub also provides opportunities for farmers, ranchers, and wild harvesters to increase revenue by adding value to their products.

To maximize the impact of Sprout Kitchen, the City of Quesnel selected the previously vacant 101 Marsh Drive in West Quesnel as the location for the Food Hub.

How it ties into the Community Vision

This project falls under the Innovative Resource Industries pillar of the City’s Economic Development Transition Strategy. Supporting new businesses and business growth in this sector helps to diversify the local economy by increasing local food production and processing.

Funding Partners:

  • Province of British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries
  • Northern Development Initiative Trust
  • City of Quesnel
Fuel Management Trails

The Fuel Management Trail system is a hard-packed, low-grade network of forested paths suitable for wheelchairs and strollers. There is a 500 metre low-mobility loop that has three log benches for resting in beautiful surroundings. People of all ages and skill levels can bike,
walk, or run on the paths. All four loops add up to more than 3 kilometres of trails to explore.

While you walk or bike the trails, see if you can spot the areas where techniques such as pruning, thinning, debris removal, and fuel breaks have been used to reduce the wildfire risk.

Start Date – End Date
Fuel management completed: 2019 – 2020
Trail building completed: 2020 – 2021

Cost
$92,458

Benefit to the Community

Fuel management” means to change the structure and composition of a forest to reduce the fuel available to burn in a wildfire. Effective fuel management should result in less severe wildfires, greater public and firefighter safety, and faster recovery for forest ecosystems.

The Fuel Management Trails wind through a fuel-managed demonstration forest, where trail users can experience what a fuel-treated group of trees looks like. There is also an educational kiosk with more information on wildfire prevention and FireSmart BC.

How it ties into the Community Vision

The Fuel Management Trail system links to the City’s larger Economic Transition Strategy by making strategic investments in projects that strengthen community resilience, while expanding trails for improved community livability.

Funding Partners:

  • Forest Enhancement Society of BC
  • Community Resilience Investment Program
  • Forest Employment Program
  • Canadian Red Cross
  • West Fraser Mills Ltd.
Wonderland Trail Network

The Wonderland Trail Network is located 10.2 kilometres southeast of Quesnel on Quesnel-Hydraulic Road, and is a recently updated network of multi-use trails for hiking, biking and snowshoeing. There is a parking lot and an information kiosk located at the trailhead. Use the Trailforks app to navigate on the trails. 

Mucho Oro: Intermediate trail. This machine-built flow trail will challenge a rider’s skill level while providing riders a sense of flow. Wonderland: Intermediate, all mountain trail. This hand-built trail, originally constructed in the early 90’s, saw a complete rebuild in 2021, with technical trail features throughout the rocky technical trail.

Sluice Box: Intermediate trail. A hand-built, gully trail that will offer riders large berms and a sense of flow, encouraging riders of all ages to progress naturally and improve their bike skills.
Woodbury’s Way: Intermediate trail. This hand-built, all mountain trail contains long downhill sections as well as some sustained climbs.

Angry Beaver: Intermediate trail. This hand-built, downhill trail will challenge riders with technical terrain and will feature long open sections with rolling contour downhills.

Development of the Wonderland Trail Network has been supported by the Trail Coordinator, a position funded by the City of Quesnel and Cariboo Regional District through the Sub-Regional Recreation budget. These trails are made possible by the hard work and dedication of the Gold Rush Cycling Club.

Start Date – End Date
2019 – Ongoing Development

Cost
$200,000+

Benefit to the Community

The Wonderland Trail Network, since becoming a legally sanctioned network in 2019, has seen a huge increase in local use and has become a tourist destination for trail enthusiasts.

Trail counter statistics show averages of approximately 50 users per day. The Gold Rush Cycling Club maintains the network and has seen its club membership numbers climb to more than 250 users.

How it ties into the Community Vision

The trail development falls under the Destination Development pillar of the City’s Economic Development Transition Strategy, while also improving community livability for new and existing residents.

The Wonderland Trail Network is a great example of utilizing a master plan to develop a trail network into a significant community asset. The City of Quesnel and Cariboo Regional District, in partnership with the Gold Rush Cycling Club, are committed to further developing and marketing trails in the Wonderland area, using a phased approach.

Funding Partners:

  • BC Rural Dividend
  • Northern Development Initiative Trust
  • City of Quesnel
  • Gold Rush Cycling Club
  • Quesnel Community Foundation
  • Recreation Sites and Trails BC
  • Cariboo Regional District
Museum & Visitor Centre

The Quesnel Museum and Visitor Centre was under renovation and is now complete. The new updates include a new front façade with an accessible and energy-efficient entrance, redesigned layout to improve traffic flow, and a new year-round accessible bathroom.

The “behind the scenes” space has been reorganized to meet museum and public health standards, including a meeting room and catering kitchen, an office, and a curatorial workspace. The project separated the ventilation systems for the building and the public bathrooms and addressed drainage issues to reduce safety hazards in the winter.

Start Date – End Date
2020 – July 2021

Cost
$1,400,000

Benefit to the Community

The renovation of the Museum and Visitor Centre refreshed aging infrastructure and made the building more inviting and accessible to visitors and residents. An attractive photomural and new signage provide a new look to this community facility at the entry point to downtown Quesnel. The Quesnel Museum houses thousands of artifacts and countless stories of our region’s history. The accessible public bathroom will now be available to the public year round.

How it ties into the Community Vision

The Museum renovation project falls under the Destination Development pillar of the City’s Economic Development Transition Strategy. The photomural and bright new spaces create a positive impression on visitors, encouraging them to stop and spend more time at the facility. The staff at the Visitor Centre then have an opportunity to direct them to other amenities and services in the community. Finally, the upgraded facilities offer new opportunities for facility rental and hosting space in close proximity to the City’s event precinct.

Funding Partners:

  • Federal Gas Tax
  • Canada Cultural Spaces Fund
  • Northern Development Initiative Trust
  • City of Quesnel
Alex Fraser Park Agricultural Event Centre

This project included the demolition of the old Fur and Feather buildings in Alex Fraser Park and the construction of a new multi-purpose agriculture building. The new building increases the ability of Alex Fraser Park Society and its associated agricultural member groups to host events. Agricultural events support the growth of the sector in the region, while also supporting the visitor economy. The facility holds offices for Alex Fraser Park Society, meeting space, and may be used to hold agricultural training programs which were previously difficult to host without a proper venue. The facility may also be used as an emergency animal shelter in the event of a disaster.

Start Date – End Date
Spring 2019 – Fall 2020

Cost
$1,200,000

Benefit to the Community

Alex Fraser Park attracts and hosts major agriculture events in the City of Quesnel. It also provides emergency animal shelter in the event of a disaster such as a wildfire. This site promotes the agricultural aspects of our community.

How it ties into the Community Vision

This project supports event hosting under the Destination Development pillar of the Economic Development Transition Strategy and improved emergency preparedness.

Funding Partners:

  • City of Quesnel
  • Cariboo Regional District
  • BC Rural Dividend
  • Northern Development Initiative Trust
Forestry Innovation Centre

The Forestry Innovation Centre is a flexible work environment designed to foster innovation and collaboration. It houses the Forestry Initiatives Program and showcases locally made structural and finishing wood products, local artisan furniture and art installations. As the Centre is an active working space, it is not open to the public daily. Open houses are scheduled periodically to give the public a chance to visit and learn about our forestry initiatives.

The Forestry Initiatives Program was created to encourage home and business owners to FireSmart their properties, implement our Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP), advocate for landscape level analysis and restoration and explore ways to innovate the forest products manufacturing sector.

The objective of the program is to build ‘home-grown’ solutions for Quesnel during our time of transition to be innovative, resilient and help grow a sustainable future for everyone who chooses to call the area home.

Start Date – End Date
March 2019 – September 2020

Cost
$156,500

Benefit to the Community

This project has helped to secure $3 million of grant funding for fire mitigation work. In addition, 150 hectares of fire mitigation work has been completed, 80 homes and buildings in Quesnel and area have been assessed for fire hazard, and 26 Community Resiliency Investment rebates have been fulfilled (a total of $13,000). More than 700 person-days of employment have been created to date with the City’s fuel management work (not including City staff time).

How it ties into the Community Vision

The Forestry Program falls under the Innovative Resource Industries pillar in the Economic Development Transition Strategy. The forestry industry employs more people in Quesnel than any other industry. Climate change, the mountain pine beetle and wildfires have changed our forest landscape. Forestry today is changing, and our Forestry Initiatives program works with industry, First Nations, and other levels of government to ensure Quesnel continues to have a strong, innovative forestry sector. The Forestry Initiatives Program also includes initiatives that protect our community from wildfire.

Funding Partners:

  • City of Quesnel
  • Cariboo Strong
  • Canadian Red Cross
  • Forest Enhancement Society of BC
  • BC Rural Dividend
  • Community Resiliency Investment Program
  • Forest Employment Program
  • Northern Development Initiative Trust
Alive After Five

The Alive After Five initiative aims to bring new life to the downtown. Improvements have been made to the Spirit Square stage area, including orientation, and improved lighting and electrical capability. Spirit Centre has a new façade, and added indoor storage for tables and chairs to be used for performances and events. An evening performance series will be held in 2022.

This project is in partnership with the Quesnel Downtown Association.

Start Date – End Date
2020 – 2021

Cost
$226,200

Benefit to the Community

Improvements to Spirit Square and Spirit Centre enable better community events to be held in the downtown. More events on weekday evenings support downtown businesses, provides free entertainment for local residents, and welcomes visitors including those coming on the Rocky Mountaineer.

Improvements to this venue build on Quesnel’s hosting capacity. The City is working to attract more events to Quesnel each year to grow our visitor economy. Events bring outside dollars into our community and are often held outside of the regular tourism season.

How it ties into the Community Vision

This project fits under the Destination Development pillar and the Business and Resident Retention & Attraction and Retention pillar of the City’s Economic Development Transition Strategy.

Funding Partners:

  • Northern Development Initiative Trust
  • Quesnel Downtown Association
  • Owner of 246 Kinchant Street
  • City of Quesnel
Public Works

The new Public Works facility, located at 1350 Sword Avenue, reached substantial completion on January 25, 2021.
The new facility hosts administrative areas for public works staff, mechanical bays, utility functions, carpentry, gardening, sheltered and open vehicle storage and needed functional assets. On October 20, 2018, the Public Works facility referendum passed with 76.20% of voters in favour of borrowing up to $8.5 million. This modern building replaces the old, decaying, and inefficient public works buildings that were located in the floodplain of the Quesnel River.

Start Date – End Date
2020 – 2021

Cost
$13,000,000

Benefit to the Community

The Public Works facility supports City crews that work hard to make Quesnel an attractive and livable city for all residents and businesses to enjoy. The new facility is secure, safe, and consolidates multiple related functions to one convenient location and houses essential works assets.

It was getting too difficult to maintain a safe public works facility at the old location; the combination of high construction costs, inflation and deteriorating buildings made it essential to relocate.

How it ties into the Community Vision

This project is part of Council’s Strategic Plan to reinvest in key infrastructure.

Funding Partners:

  • No partners

Projects in process

RV Park and Campground

The City RV and Tenting Campground will begin construction in 2021 and is expected to be completed in 2022. The campground will be located along the Quesnel River, within walking distance of downtown Quesnel and accessible via the City’s Riverfront Trail network. It is anticipated that the campground will operate annually from late spring to the early fall for short term stays.

Anticipated amenities and features:

  • 18 RV sites – partially serviced
  • 3 tent only sites
  • washroom facility
  • close proximity to downtown
  • access to Riverfront Trail network

Start Date – End Date
2021 – 2022

Cost
$1,210,500

Benefit to the Community

Many municipalities run their own RV Parks. This one will be unique in the region for its proximity to downtown and access to our trail networks and other amenities. The new RV Park will encourage visitors to stop within City limits and spend more time in our community.

How it ties into the Community Vision

The City RV and Tenting Campground is an important feature in the Quesnel Waterfront Plan and falls within the Destination Development pillar of the City’s Economic Development Transition Strategy.

Funding Partners:

  • Northern Development Initiative Trust
  • Community Economic Recovery Infrastructure Program
  • City of Quesnel
  • Federal Gas Tax
Child Care Centre

The new child care facility will be constructed on Webster Avenue in West Quesnel in 2022. The new 4,759 square foot facility will provide space for infant, preschool, and school age programs. The City plans to enter an agreement with the Quesnel and District Day Care Society to manage the facility.

There will be 8 infant spaces, 25 preschool spaces, and 24 school age spaces created as a result of this project.

Start Date – End Date
Fall 2021 – Summer 2022

Cost
$1,359,875

Benefit to the Community

The North Cariboo Child Care Inventory and Action Plan, completed in 2020, noted that Quesnel needs to add 86 spaces in order to reach the provincial average. The 57 child care spaces established with this project will create new jobs, while supporting families.

How it ties into the Community Vision

This project supports the Resident and Business Retention and Attraction pillar of the Economic Development Transition Strategy.

Families consider the availability of quality child care in making the decision to move to or stay in a community.

Funding Partners:

  • Childcare BC New Spaces Fund
Arts & Recreation Centre Bike Park & Trails

New trails and a bike park are being constructed behind the Quesnel & District Arts & Recreation Centre. This project includes construction of an up-to-date progressive jump park, a beginner-friendly skills park, a rubberized strider bike area, construction of Flow B trail, and the renovation of Flow A trail. Rental bikes will also be available once the bike park and trail project is complete.

Start Date – End Date
Summer 2021 – Summer 2022

Cost
$288,500

Benefit to the Community

The new bike park and trails will help to increase tourism and resident recruitment while providing free outdoor recreation amenities for locals. The bike park will also provide a separate area for small children to safely learn how to ride a bicycle.

How it ties into the Community Vision

This project falls under the Destination Development and Business and Resident Retention and Attraction pillars of the City of Quesnel’s Economic Development Transition Strategy.

The City of Quesnel and Cariboo Regional District recognize the value of trails for both residents and visitors. The Trails Coordinator is funded jointly through the sub-regional recreation budget to develop and expand trails identified in the North Cariboo Trails Inventory and Master Plan, using a phased approach.

Funding Partners:

  • Northern Development Initiative Trust
  • Federal Gas Tax
Airport Improvements

The Runway Rehabilitation Project includes the rehabilitation of the airport’s runway, taxiway, and apron. This includes realigning runway lighting and electrical work. The Helipad Replacement Project involves the demolition of the existing concrete helipad and the construction of a new, larger helipad made of asphalt and concrete. Additionally, there will be upgrades to the existing storm drainage system, as well as the installation of topsoil, grass sod, concrete sidewalk, and paint markings.

Start Date – End Date
Runway rehabilitation: Spring 2022 – Fall 2022
Helipad replacement: Summer 2021 – Fall 2021

Cost
Runway rehabilitation: $8,789,910
Helipad replacement: $464,650

Benefit to the Community

Upgrading critical infrastructure at the airport is essential to ensure that the airport can continue to service the community. The airport is an essential transportation link for economic development of the region. The airport is also critical infrastructure for health and safety supporting the air ambulance service and wildfire management.

How it ties into the Community Vision

This project supports all pillars in the Economic Development Transition Strategy as the airport is used by visitors, residents, small business and major industry.

Funding Partners:

  • British Columbia Air Access Program (Helipad replacement)
  • Airport Capital Assistance Program (Runway rehabilitation)
  • Federal Gas Tax (Helipad replacement)
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